Logo
Welcome Directions Directory District Committees District Goals District Mission Statement Ethical Standards Human Relations Organizational Vision Strategic Plan Wellness Policy
Board Of Education Agendas / Minutes Board Committee Representation Board Policies District Goals Organizational Core Beliefs
Educational Services Our Committment Common Core State Standards Accountability Curriculum and Instruction Educational Programs Student Services Program Improvement
Business Services Child Care Child Nutrition Services Graphic Arts Human Resources Information Technology Maintenance, Operations and Transportation (MOT) Special Education Superintendent's Office
Parent-Student-Community Information Flyer Distribution Library - Online Public Access Catalog Medi-Cal New Students / Registraton Newark Police Department Newark Neighborhood Watch Program Partnership Compact School Boundaries
Student Support Attendance Fremont Family Resource Center Staying Healthy Staying Safe Newark Wellness Center No Bully Zone Standardized Tests - Helping Children Succeed
Staff Resources/Links/Forms Educator Effectiveness Evaluation Ethical Standards FOSS Science Information FOSS Science Forms Tools of the Trade
safe.jpg

Staying Safe

Traffic Safety - seguridad vial

                                                                                                                                               SPANISH TRANSLATION

As we begin the school year, Newark Police Department will begin citing drivers whenever necessary to encourage compliance of traffic laws and to reinforce that safety of our children is a priority.

There have been multiple incidents endangering children even a child being struck and several near misses.  Please remember that children’s cognitive abilities are still developing and they lack training and experience in traffic safety.  

Keys to avoid receiving a citation:

  • Drive Slow
  • Do not make illegal U-turns
  • Have car seats for children
  • Have seat belts on all passengers
  • Make a “full-stop” at stop signs

Putting our children at risk is not worth the few minutes you may save by rushing and breaking these suggestions.  Newark Unified School District and the Newark Police Department want to keep everyone safe.

Safety reminders for children walking to school:

  • Walk, don’t run across the street
  • Look left, look right and left again
  • Obey Walk/Wait signals
  • Do not cross at mid-block locations
  • Use crosswalks

Safety reminders for children biking to school:

  • Always wear a properly fastened and fitted helmet
  • Obey all traffic laws
  • Ride in the same direction as motor vehicles
  • Check traffic when changing lanes, crossing streets or turning
  • Use hand signals

5 Tips on Talking to Kids About Scary News

With the tragic story of a mass shooting in Connecticut flashing on the news this morning, parents may find themselves awkwardly fielding questions from their kids. How do you explain that scary events do occur while still making your children feel safe?

We talked to Dr. Paul Coleman, author of How to Say It to Your Child When Bad Things Happen, to find out the best ways to talk to kids about disturbing images and events.

Wait until they're older.Until around age 7, Dr. Coleman suggests only addressing the tough stuff if kids bring it up first. "They might see it on TV or hear about it at school (or heaven forbid even witness it), and then you have to deal with it. But younger children might not be able to handle it well," says Dr. Coleman.

Keep it black and white.Yes, the world can be a cruel place, but little kids, well, can't handle the truth."Younger kids need to be reassured that this isn't happening to them and won't happen to them," says Dr. Coleman. Parents may feel like they're lying, since no one can ever be 100% sure of what the future holds, but probability estimates are not something small kids can grasp, and won't comfort them.

Ask questions.Don't assume you know how they feel. Instead, get at their understanding of what happened. "They might be afraid -- or just curious. You have to ascertain that by asking things like 'What did you hear? What do you think?'" says Dr. Coleman. "If they are scared, ask what they're afraid of - don't assume you know. They could be using twisted logic, like they see a building collapse on TV and think it's Mommy's office building. Correct any misconceptions, and then offer assurance."

Don't label feelings as wrong.Let them know that their feelings make sense, and that it's ok to feel whatever they're feeling. Never make them feel bad about being scared.

Use it as a teaching moment.Talking about bad things can lead to discussions about how to help others, and gives parents an opportunity to model compassion. Talk about donating to a relief organization, or make the message even more personal. "You can say, 'It makes me think of Mrs. Smith in a wheelchair down the road - maybe we should make her a pot roast,'" says Dr. Coleman.

When Tragedy Affects Someone Your Kids Know

Sometimes tragedy strikes closer to home, and there's no way to shield your kids. If you're dealing with the death of a friend or family member, be truthful about it, but offer some separation between what happened and what they fear might happen. "Say 'Grandma was very old and very sick, but I'm not,'" says Dr. Coleman. "Distinguish yourself clearly from that person so your child can rest comfortably knowing Mommy's not going anywhere."